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PNC’s annual report says that buying everything mentioned in the Twelve Days of Christmas song would cost $27,673.22 in 2014; buying the numbers of items mentioned would cost a whopping $116,273.06. Who needs six geese a-laying anyway? Five golden rings? I think not.

Here are my Twelve days of Christmas for the Writer on a Shoestring. You may already have many of these items. Take what ideas you like and adapt your own; treat yourself to tools for your aspirations, tools for your craft.

  1. Buy a small notebook to take with you everywhere. I use a 3′ x 6′ that fits neatly in my back pocket–fits easily into purses as well. One never knows when a great idea or observation strikes. Get it down or you might lose it.
  1. Make sure you have enough pens and pencils. I use a mechanical pencil to jot notes; erasing is a big thing for me.
  1. Purchase a larger notebook. I use a 6′ x 9′ steno notebook; some of my friends use regular 8 ½’ by 11′ ringed notebooks. I keep the notebook next to me when I am at the keyboard in case an idea arrives that is not affiliated with what I am currently working on–a quick note will remind me of things to focus on later.
  1. Get a new writing book to help you with your craft. Recommendations here.
  1. Join favorite writer blogs. (Do not forget to join Knights of Writ if you have not already). Favorites are listed below in This Week’s Links.
  1. Make a list of 6 projects you want to begin (and/or finish) in 2015.
  1. Get a new novel that you have put off purchasing. Here are a few suggestions for fantasy writers.
  1. Set up a Blog. I use WordPress, which is free and relatively easy once you get over the small learning curve–they have an in-depth Help section to assist with this.
  1. Begin a Facebook account–easy and free. I scoffed at this for a long while, but have found it a valuable place to let friends know what I am doing.
  1. Join Writer’s Digest. Cost is $9.99 a year (one year free access if you buy Writer’s Market or Novel and Short Story Writing Markets). On their website they have a forum that covers all areas of writing, a search function for agents and publishers, and much more.
  1. Sign-up for free newsletters that will arrive in your email in-box and help keep the spark alive. (See Writer’s Links Below)
  1. Share your writing. Due to the response of last week’s challenge, I am extending my offer until the end of the year. After that, I will delve into several planned projects (see Day 6). A special thanks to the brave writers who sent me snippets of their writing, and also to the writers to who took the time to read and critique The Returning. Many Thanks to All.

Take a look at today’s links, notes, and weekly quote below. Make your own list, then go write–the world needs your input.


This Week’s Link and Notes:

Writer’s Digest: Free newsletter that has great info on all phases of writing and publishing.

James Scott Bell: Author of How-To writing books and thriller fiction.

Nephele: Agent for The Knight Agency. (Do not get confused: her and I use the same WordPress theme–I just adapted mine a bit).

Chuck Sambuchino: Great information about agents, publishers, and keeping abreast of the changing marketplace.

James Robert Brewer: Poetry blog, but useful items for fiction writers also.

There are thousands more; search for your own favorites; post here for others to see.

This Week’s Quote:

Writing Musings

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